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My experience training nurses to restore sight in Vietnam

2022-05-16 10:48:37

Hello,

My name is Angeline and I’m a Senior Staff Nurse at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London. I’m also a medical volunteer with Orbis. In the past year I’ve helped train nurses in Cameroon, Bangladesh and Vietnam and seen first-hand just how important this work is.

I’m emailing to tell you a bit about my time in Vietnam with the Orbis Flying Eye Hospital in May last year. Thanks to the donations of kind Orbis supporters, I was able to train medical staff and assist in surgeries that gave children the gift of sight.

This work is badly needed and there is still more to do. There are more than 23,000 blind children in Vietnam, and many more adults with a wide range of eye conditions.

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I vividly remember how crowded the waiting room was at Can Tho Eye Hospital – so many people, all wanting to be helped. When I saw that, I really understood just how important it is to train more nurses and other medical staff.

You would have been inspired by the enthusiasm of the trainee nurses I met in Vietnam. As I taught sessions with them aboard the Orbis Flying Eye Hospital, it was amazing to watch them hone their skills so they can give their patients the best possible care.

I do what I do because I firmly believe that more eye care personnel serving poorer, rural communities across the world means more is being done to prevent avoidable blindness. You can continue to make this happen.

Because much of it is avoidable. You could help so many children get access to quality eye care and have their sight restored. Without this, many could be left blind for the rest of their lives. It’s so tragic. There’s one little boy in Vietnam called Tam who’s a perfect example of the difference you can make, but I’ll tell you about him in another email.

For now, I just wanted to thank you for helping to give more people the gift of sight. It really is such a life-changing thing, to open someone’s eyes so that they are no longer consigned to a life of darkness.

Thank you for reading my email. I’ll write to you again in a few days, with the story of Tam – the little Vietnamese boy whose life has been changed by cataract surgery. It’s a wonderful story and I know you’ll enjoy reading about him.

Yours sincerely,

Angeline Chaipa
Senior Staff Nurse and Orbis Medical Volunteer

PS. Operation Sight is Orbis UK’s ambitious campaign against avoidable blindness. There are still a few more months to go, with some very ambitious targets to meet before the end of 2018. Anything you can give right now will help give more people the gift of sight.

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